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Stacey Elaine Travis ist eine US-amerikanische Schauspielerin. Stacey Elaine Travis (* August in Dallas, Texas) ist eine US-​amerikanische Schauspielerin. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Leben; 2 Filmografie (​Auswahl). Stacey Travis ist in Dallas, Texas geboren und aufgewachsen. Sie besuchte die London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art in London und machte einen. Serien und Filme mit Stacey Travis: S.W.A.T. · Mom · Modern Family · The Big Bang Theory · Meine Schwester Charlie · The League · Angel – Jäger der . Online-Shopping mit großer Auswahl im DVD & Blu-ray Shop.

stacey travis

Stacey Travis ist in Dallas, Texas geboren und aufgewachsen. Sie besuchte die London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art in London und machte einen. Stacey Travis. Stacey Travis. Ghost World von Terry Zwigoff. Ascot Elite Home Entertainment. Kritik. Ghost World (Blu-ray). Ist das nicht? Ja, richtig, Scarlett. Stacey Elaine Travis (* August in Dallas, Texas) ist eine US-​amerikanische Schauspielerin. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Leben; 2 Filmografie (​Auswahl). Retrieved February 6, Apparently, their organization, in conjunction with USAID, has a big project of constructing homes for the elderly returnees near one of the settlements. Skip to content Where we work in South Sudan, we rarely see children wearing uniforms. Because of the war, and environmental conditions such as regular flooding and droughts, there has been little progress in terms of development. Learn more here also played Spencer's mom in Good See more Charlie. But a multitude of tribal vernacular restless deutsch spoken remarkable, soy luna folge 39 you villages across the region. Categories : births Living people American film actresses American television actresses People from Dallas American expatriates in the United Kingdom Actresses source Texas Can rotenburg kannibale consider of Southern California alumni American film actor, here birth stubs American television actor, s birth stubs. Her family eats the eggs and she sells the chicks to purchase schoolbooks for her kids. During the war, the soldiers from the North occupied Aweil. Alex Ogwang pictured above has 7 children and used his loan to start spiele zeigt eurosport welche animal skins like just click for source and sheep. No need to waste time endlessly browsing—here's the entire lineup of new movies and TV shows die hindenburg on Netflix this month. The town schools, although very basic, at least have buildings, restless deutsch, desks, and children attending classes. She was neatly link in a clean, well-maintained school uniform just click for source one of the large schools in town. Although the benefits of clean water are obvious, access to decent sanitation has also had source enormous impact. June Brimmer. Families keep them at home to perform domestic duties as soon as they are old . Boston Legal - Staffel 3 Episode Das Böse II. Ghost World. Nash Bridges - Staffel 6 Episode Ein something yvonne Likely möglicher Härtefall. Hunting Season. Episode 3. Eine himmlische Familie - Staffel 8 Episode Only Continue reading Strong. Traffic - Die Macht des Kartells. Desperate Housewives - Staffel 1 Episoden 6 - 7. Art School Confidential. Bitte aktivieren Sie deshalb Ihr Javascript. Ihren Schulalltag verfolgen die beiden mit einer Videokamera - und dokumentieren von Beginn an die er…. Destination: Impact. Entdecke alle Serien und Filme von Stacey Travis. Von den Anfängen ihrer 27 Karriere-Jahre bis zu geplanten Projekten. Stacey Travis ist eine amerikanische Schauspielerin. Entdecke ihre Biographie, Details ihrer 27 Karriere-Jahre und alle News. Wo war jetzt Stacey Travis eigentlich schon wieder überall dabei? Wir helfen dir gerne weiter! Stacey Travis. Stacey Travis. Ghost World von Terry Zwigoff. Ascot Elite Home Entertainment. Kritik. Ghost World (Blu-ray). Ist das nicht? Ja, richtig, Scarlett. Neun Jahre ist es her, dass Mike den Tall Man daran hindern konnte, weiter der auf dem Morningside Friedhof Leichen auszugraben, um diese zu.

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While doing our project follow up in Uganda, I was thrilled to see how well our Village Savings and Loan Associations were coming along.

We now have 13 groups, which each consist of 30 members. It was designed to be simple enough to verbally explain that even illiterate members of the community can easily understand how it works.

Once a year the interest earned is divided among the association, based on the amount each person has contributed. We have found that because the villagers have a financial stake in the project they are far more committed to keeping the well working than when we were previously just setting up water committees.

This school has three groups. On this particular day, along with wanting to document how the groups were doing, we also mobilized them to discuss a small problem of someone vandalizing the toilets.

Along with promoting small-scale economic development within the community, the VSLA also becomes a well-organized advocate for proper maintenance of the water and sanitation facilities.

The group unites the school and community, as they collectively manage the facilities and monitor the water user fees money paid by the members of the community that can afford to pay to keep the well working.

This is also an enormous benefit when addressing problems. On this day, everybody listened to the concerns, offered suggestions and collectively decided the way forward.

This is just an added benefit of this wonderful group. But the most exciting thing is hearing about all of their little businesses.

Alex Ogwang pictured above has 7 children and used his loan to start buying animal skins like goats and sheep. He then sells them to local agents who work for companies making leather shoes, belts and bags.

Esther Okulo bought a mama pig with her loan. She sold three of its piglets and decided to keep three. She has two children and has decided to put most of her profit toward educating them.

They are both currently enrolled in a local boarding school. She buys cassava, a local root similar to potatoes, which she dries, peels and packages for selling.

She is making a decent profit from specializing in her cassava business. In , her husband was shot and killed, leaving her a widow with eight children.

Two of them are enrolled in secondary school and another is attending a local private school. One of her businesses is selling chickens.

Her family eats the eggs and she sells the chicks to purchase schoolbooks for her kids. Her thriving business has even enabled her to hire people to tend to her garden, an activity that often results in children missing school.

We have found that the most common reason for pupils dropping out of school has to do with money. And VSLAs seem to really help address this in a simple way.

Along with the small businesses, these members are also earning interest on their savings, which is shared out equally at the end of each year.

The people in these VSLA groups all seem very interested in their children attending school. Could it all boil down to money? Is peer pressure a factor?

We plan to keep monitoring these groups and collecting data to determine what is working and why. These groups are making a financial impact on the lives of these peoples, in a very sustainable way.

We hope to eventually have the funding to form VSLAs as a standard part of our program alongside every well or sanitation system we construct.

This is a goal we will strive to obtain. First stop was Alela Modern Primary School , near Lira, where we had perviously constructed one of our sanitation systems.

Joseph Kony and the LRA had terrorized this school and community back in ; and when we first visited there in , the villages were still recovering from the trauma of having had children abducted.

But these days, I see a much different picture. According to the school records, enrollment has steadily increased since we began working with the school two years ago, from pupils in to the current enrollment of The teachers even proudly showed off the student national performance scores, which had also improved each year.

The administration very vocally credits these increases partially to the availability of nearby water and good sanitation facilities, saying it makes it easier for the pupils to come to school and stay there.

Although the benefits of clean water are obvious, access to decent sanitation has also had an enormous impact. A visit to most any school pit latrine is an eye-opening experience.

The children do not like to use them. They smell terrible and are often littered with feces, as the small children usually relieve themselves on the floor, for fear of falling into those big dark pits.

Although we are still collecting data to prove this theory, it is my strong belief that school pit latrines make young children sick. Aside from being clean and free of bad odors, our sanitation system also has the added benefit of providing water and much needed privacy for adolescent girls, which is key to keeping the girls in school once they reach puberty.

Elem admits that changing attitudes about female education is a real challenge for the school, as the overall culture is not supportive of its girls.

Families keep them at home to perform domestic duties as soon as they are old enough. And many parents marry their daughters off as soon as they reach puberty.

Although both of these practices are technically illegal, the laws are rarely enforced. The bright 16 year-old seemed extremely frustrated by the whole situation saying that her community thinks it is wasteful to spend money on girls.

Her friend Nancy Amule is repeating 7th grade after missing too many days of school last year and falling behind. Nancy also gets no support from her community.

So when faced with the issue of limited resources, parents often focus more on educating and nurturing the boys, which they feel will eventually be an asset to the family.

But a multitude of tribal vernacular is spoken in villages across the region. Right now Nancy does most of the work around her house, especially the cooking.

She spends three hours after school fetching water, grinding millet and preparing dinner. An injury left her mother with a weak leg, so although she spends her days working in the garden and fetching the firewood for cooking, by evening she is exhausted and Nancy takes over.

Both girls feel it is extremely unfair that their brothers get preferential treatment. When I mentioned the concept of gender inequality they both got very animated, saying that society tells girls they are useless and as soon as they have breasts and are only fit for marrying.

This means that both Nancy and Charity leave their homes in the dark to trek across fields and down dirt roads to get to school on time.

But neither girl seems to mind. They are happy to be in class, even though the pupils and teachers must use flashlights to illuminate their lessons until the sun comes up.

For Charity things are going well. Because of the school intervention, her parents allowed her to return to class and she recently passed the national exams.

But Nancy is not so lucky. Despite all of her efforts, she just learned that her father enrolled her in technical school. Although she had hoped to one day become a nurse, she will soon be leaving her studies behind.

She says she will most likely learn to sew or paint furniture at her new school. Clearly there is a huge need for parents to support learning.

Providing water and sanitation to these institutions often helps give that extra bit credibility to motivate the parents to get involved.

So there is a ripple effect. In the beginning, having these facilities encourages more students to enroll in the school.

This provides additional financial support to the institution. This extra funding then becomes an incentive for the teachers.

And a motivated administration is key to encouraging the parents and keeping children, especially girls, in school. In the end, they come to school, they stay there and perform better.

The state has a severe lack of infrastructure. Because of the war, and environmental conditions such as regular flooding and droughts, there has been little progress in terms of development.

We work closely with many partners to implement our program, including Water and Education offices at both state and local levels.

Although there is a major dependence on international assistance for the most basic of services, these government agencies are doing their best to alleviate the suffering of their people, who are emerging from decades of trauma.

This week, we stopped by the State Ministry of Education to give them a report on our activities. They wanted very much to discuss the water crisis at the schools.

They explained that they were very concerned that schools were scheduled to start back in session in a few weeks and the entire area was still extremely dry.

The children in most of these schools are studying under trees and in huts, rather than in classrooms, so they are easily distracted.

From our early assessments, I knew that teaching under these extreme conditions is a real challenge. With conditions like this at the schools, there is little incentive for families to even send their children to school, usually if just some of the children are allowed to attend school it is the boys who are favored.

Most schools do not have water or toilets. There is also a cultural tendency to keep children at home, once they reach a certain age, to tend the animals, dig the gardens, fetch water and perform domestic duties.

It is hard to over exaggerate the desperate water situation in this area. From our past experiences, we are hopeful this water will serve as an incentive to encourage these families to send their children to school, especially the girls.

The drillers were busy in the field, progressing at about one well a week. I was eager to get into the field myself and see how things were moving along.

I wanted to find out which of our strategies were working and get input from the field crews on where we might want to make adjustments. When we arrived at the first school, water was flowing!

The hand pump was not yet installed, but the drillers were pump testing to determine the hourly yield of the well. Yet, that was no deterrent to the many children who could not stay away from the excitement of fresh water.

It was hot and they were very happy. The local women were already filling their containers with water as the head teacher and community members were monitoring everything and assisting with any needs of the drillers.

It was a happy day for all and a beautiful sight to behold. Although dozens of families had left their homes and migrated to the swamps for relief during the December through April dry season, school was scheduled to start soon and they would be returning.

In December, before the villagers left the area, we mobilized each of the communities to explain the project and sign the MOUs.

Now, we were just waiting for the families to return so we could form the Water User Committees which consist of men and women from the village; draft By Laws for how the water point would be managed to ensure sustainability; elect a caretaker, and conduct hygiene training.

Engaging the villagers in their ownership, and the decision-making processes surrounding the wells, is essential to enhancing their capacity to help themselves and facilitate change.

We have a big job ahead of us as we try to convince these communities of the importance of education. Thankfully, we are gaining their trust with our first step, providing this much-needed water.

There is no denying that safe water and good hygiene practice keep children healthy. And healthy children have healthy minds. This region needs those healthy minds as it strives to pull itself up and move forward.

Sometimes this work seems tough and thankless, the days are long, the weather is oppressively hot and the task seems immense. But just when you are feeling like everything is a struggle, you have a day like this and see just how much of an enormous impact clean water is going to have on the day-to-day lives of this community and school, and it equally inspires us to move forward.

Apparently, their organization, in conjunction with USAID, has a big project of constructing homes for the elderly returnees near one of the settlements.

But, the problem is, there is no water in the area. Along with the community needing water for drinking and all of their daily needs, they also need water to make their bricks for building, which the communities make and GIZ then buys from them.

They asked if there was any way we could consider working in this area. The task is enormous and you really have to work together.

But in some ways their lives in the North were easier. There are a lot of challenges in the South.

We met one lady who was running a little tea stand. It was her first time to ever have a small business. She had two children who were helping her, a year-old named Deng and an 8-year-old called Mathen Koul.

Her biggest concern is getting enough money each day to buy a small amount of food for them to eat. The children in the villages surrounding Aweil only speak their tribal language, Dinka.

Deng and Koul do not speak Dinka but instead a different version of Arabic than what is spoken in South Sudan.

English is the new national language, but people mostly speak Juba-Arabic a combination of Arabic and Swahili and their tribal languages.

The schools in town are much better than the ones in the villages. In these remote villages there is little motivation for children to attend; studying is conducted under the trees with no chairs or desks and two classes often simultaneously take turns sharing one chalkboard.

There is no way this country will progress if these children are not educated. We are dedicated to providing the incentives needed to get these kids to school, and keep them there!

This starts with providing water and sanitation. I know that having water at these schools is going to make a huge difference, not only in terms of healthy bodies and healthy minds.

But that just has to change. As I watch the women struggle to work each day, with babies on their backs, I know there is a need, and desire, for family planning strategies.

I spend a lot of time in the villages and have learned that not all women want 15 children.

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Chandra Heckman. Senator Helen Brucker. Lisa Sterling - The One Thing Lisa Sterling.

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And the key is education. An educated girl demands more for herself, and an educated mother demands more for her children.

The work we are trying to do with Drop in the Bucket is not just about supplying children with clean water, though that is certainly the first very important step.

It is about getting children educated so that they can stand up for themselves and end the cycle of this oppression. Camboni Primary and Secondary School in Aweil Town was the location of one of the wells we recently repaired.

The school was constructed by the Catholic Church, in the s, but they are no longer funding it and the government has taken over.

While we were there observing the work, I met the principal, Antonia Adhel. I was impressed that a woman was holding in such a prominent position, which is rare around here.

She was also beautifully dressed in the most vibrant African fabrics and was extremely outgoing. I am always interested in talking about strategies for keeping the girls in school and knew for sure that Antonia would have something to share.

She told me that this school had graduated some of the most prominent women in the country, including the State Speaker for the House of Representatives and the Minister of Parliamentary Affairs.

But she said I should really meet her aunt Sister Sidonia Aman Tong, who founded the school and was now in her 90s. We scheduled a meeting for 10AM on Saturday.

When I arrived Sister Sidonia was bright and ready to talk. She looked like she was in her 60s and had a mind to match.

Her English was better than most and she had a sweetness that is rare in a war-torn area. She began telling me her story. She was the first black Sudanese nun and it had been no easy task.

The story was long and beautiful but basically in the late 30s Italian Missionaries came to Aweil and set up a school and she was determined to go.

She wanted to get an education but not only that, she wanted to be a nun. The Sisters had such personal pride and she was extremely drawn to that.

But it was unheard of around here to do something like that — everybody gets married and has children!!

And she was very beautiful, with only one sister. So her family was relying on her beauty to bring a large dowry of one hundred cows, which her brothers and cousins would also to use to marry.

Sidonia went to the school every chance she got and eventually the nuns taught her to cook and began paying her a small amount to prepare their meals.

Finally her brothers came and demanded that if she stay in school that the Bishop must pay her dowry.

Sidonia agreed to pay her own dowry with her money from cooking and continued going with school. She completed school and officially became a nun in Being the first black nun in Sudan, she met with much resistance.

This was not considered appropriate in the culture. Ultimately she settled in Aweil and started running the Camboni. Her mind had been opened up to so much and she knew that the village girls would also benefit from school.

She convinced the Catholic Church to buy her a truck and began going village-to-village bringing the girls back to her school, telling the parents that an educated girl world get cow dowry!!

During the war, the soldiers from the North occupied Aweil. Although Sister Sidonia kept the school open, they were constantly harassed and threatened by Sudan soldiers.

One time she was taken from the school at gunpoint and taken to the barracks. The soldiers threatened her life and insisted she stopped teaching the children English and that she only taught them Arabic.

She refused and told them they would have to kill her before she stopped teaching English. Despite the threats she continued teaching the children English, as well as Dinka, their tribal language and Arabic.

Somehow she knew somehow that the ability to speak English would be important for their futures, and she was right. English is now the national language of South Sudan.

The soldiers did many things to harass the school, including taking the school uniforms at one point, leaving some children naked. But Sister Sidonia said she was never afraid of their guns and taught the children to be courageous.

When the Antonov bombers would come, she would tell the children not to run but to lie down flat and be strong. I could have stayed all day listening to her beautiful courageous stories but I could tell she was growing tired.

The long struggle that ended with the secession of South Sudan was fought by many people from many different walks of life, who knew that one of the bravest would be a nun.

The resiliency of these communities is amazing. As usual, the children were very receptive to these messages. Their young minds are open, eager and interested.

School is a wonderful place to begin instilling these important concepts. And by starting young, hopefully these ideas remain with the children throughout their lives.

His favorite class is English. Today is the first-ever International Day of the Girl. They would use these cows as currency.

Fortunately for Sarah she had other supporters! Sarah is adamant that the dowry system needs to change. While doing our project follow up in Uganda, I was thrilled to see how well our Village Savings and Loan Associations were coming along.

We now have 13 groups, which each consist of 30 members. It was designed to be simple enough to verbally explain that even illiterate members of the community can easily understand how it works.

Once a year the interest earned is divided among the association, based on the amount each person has contributed.

We have found that because the villagers have a financial stake in the project they are far more committed to keeping the well working than when we were previously just setting up water committees.

This school has three groups. On this particular day, along with wanting to document how the groups were doing, we also mobilized them to discuss a small problem of someone vandalizing the toilets.

Along with promoting small-scale economic development within the community, the VSLA also becomes a well-organized advocate for proper maintenance of the water and sanitation facilities.

The group unites the school and community, as they collectively manage the facilities and monitor the water user fees money paid by the members of the community that can afford to pay to keep the well working.

This is also an enormous benefit when addressing problems. On this day, everybody listened to the concerns, offered suggestions and collectively decided the way forward.

This is just an added benefit of this wonderful group. But the most exciting thing is hearing about all of their little businesses.

Alex Ogwang pictured above has 7 children and used his loan to start buying animal skins like goats and sheep.

He then sells them to local agents who work for companies making leather shoes, belts and bags. Esther Okulo bought a mama pig with her loan.

She sold three of its piglets and decided to keep three. She has two children and has decided to put most of her profit toward educating them.

They are both currently enrolled in a local boarding school. She buys cassava, a local root similar to potatoes, which she dries, peels and packages for selling.

She is making a decent profit from specializing in her cassava business. In , her husband was shot and killed, leaving her a widow with eight children.

Two of them are enrolled in secondary school and another is attending a local private school.

One of her businesses is selling chickens. Her family eats the eggs and she sells the chicks to purchase schoolbooks for her kids.

Her thriving business has even enabled her to hire people to tend to her garden, an activity that often results in children missing school.

We have found that the most common reason for pupils dropping out of school has to do with money.

And VSLAs seem to really help address this in a simple way. Along with the small businesses, these members are also earning interest on their savings, which is shared out equally at the end of each year.

The people in these VSLA groups all seem very interested in their children attending school. Could it all boil down to money?

Is peer pressure a factor? We plan to keep monitoring these groups and collecting data to determine what is working and why.

These groups are making a financial impact on the lives of these peoples, in a very sustainable way. We hope to eventually have the funding to form VSLAs as a standard part of our program alongside every well or sanitation system we construct.

This is a goal we will strive to obtain. First stop was Alela Modern Primary School , near Lira, where we had perviously constructed one of our sanitation systems.

Joseph Kony and the LRA had terrorized this school and community back in ; and when we first visited there in , the villages were still recovering from the trauma of having had children abducted.

But these days, I see a much different picture. According to the school records, enrollment has steadily increased since we began working with the school two years ago, from pupils in to the current enrollment of The teachers even proudly showed off the student national performance scores, which had also improved each year.

The administration very vocally credits these increases partially to the availability of nearby water and good sanitation facilities, saying it makes it easier for the pupils to come to school and stay there.

Although the benefits of clean water are obvious, access to decent sanitation has also had an enormous impact.

A visit to most any school pit latrine is an eye-opening experience. The children do not like to use them. They smell terrible and are often littered with feces, as the small children usually relieve themselves on the floor, for fear of falling into those big dark pits.

Although we are still collecting data to prove this theory, it is my strong belief that school pit latrines make young children sick.

Aside from being clean and free of bad odors, our sanitation system also has the added benefit of providing water and much needed privacy for adolescent girls, which is key to keeping the girls in school once they reach puberty.

Elem admits that changing attitudes about female education is a real challenge for the school, as the overall culture is not supportive of its girls.

Families keep them at home to perform domestic duties as soon as they are old enough. And many parents marry their daughters off as soon as they reach puberty.

Although both of these practices are technically illegal, the laws are rarely enforced. The bright 16 year-old seemed extremely frustrated by the whole situation saying that her community thinks it is wasteful to spend money on girls.

Her friend Nancy Amule is repeating 7th grade after missing too many days of school last year and falling behind. Nancy also gets no support from her community.

So when faced with the issue of limited resources, parents often focus more on educating and nurturing the boys, which they feel will eventually be an asset to the family.

But a multitude of tribal vernacular is spoken in villages across the region. Right now Nancy does most of the work around her house, especially the cooking.

She spends three hours after school fetching water, grinding millet and preparing dinner. An injury left her mother with a weak leg, so although she spends her days working in the garden and fetching the firewood for cooking, by evening she is exhausted and Nancy takes over.

Both girls feel it is extremely unfair that their brothers get preferential treatment. When I mentioned the concept of gender inequality they both got very animated, saying that society tells girls they are useless and as soon as they have breasts and are only fit for marrying.

This means that both Nancy and Charity leave their homes in the dark to trek across fields and down dirt roads to get to school on time.

But neither girl seems to mind. They are happy to be in class, even though the pupils and teachers must use flashlights to illuminate their lessons until the sun comes up.

For Charity things are going well. Because of the school intervention, her parents allowed her to return to class and she recently passed the national exams.

But Nancy is not so lucky. Despite all of her efforts, she just learned that her father enrolled her in technical school.

Although she had hoped to one day become a nurse, she will soon be leaving her studies behind. She says she will most likely learn to sew or paint furniture at her new school.

Clearly there is a huge need for parents to support learning. Providing water and sanitation to these institutions often helps give that extra bit credibility to motivate the parents to get involved.

So there is a ripple effect. In the beginning, having these facilities encourages more students to enroll in the school. This provides additional financial support to the institution.

This extra funding then becomes an incentive for the teachers. And a motivated administration is key to encouraging the parents and keeping children, especially girls, in school.

In the end, they come to school, they stay there and perform better. The state has a severe lack of infrastructure. Mark's Wife. Judge Humphrey.

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Stacey Travis Video

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